Some photographs from the conference

Drinks reception: R. Salomon on 'American graffiti'
Drinks reception: R. Salomon on ‘American graffiti’
First day of the workshop- Ertegun House C. Kleinitz, 'Writing and image making practices in the Meroitic world: contextualizing the graffiti of Musawwarat es Sufra, Sudan'
First day of the workshop- Ertegun House
C. Kleinitz, ‘Writing and image making practices in the Meroitic world: contextualizing the graffiti of Musawwarat es Sufra, Sudan’
Discussions (chaired by F. Hagen)
Discussions (chaired by F. Hagen)
Final Roundtable: 'What is a graffito' ?
Final Roundtable: ‘What is a graffito’ ?
Technical session: RTI demonstration (K. Piquette)
Technical session: RTI demonstration (K. Piquette)
Group photograph - Conference dinner
Group photograph – Conference dinner
Conference dinner (Hall of Corpus Christi College)
Conference dinner (Hall of Corpus Christi College)

‘Concordance des temps’ :Graffiti from Ancient to Modern Egypt

Following up the uproar after a Chinese teenager left a graffito in the temple of Luxor and posted a photograph of it on his facebook, the BBC and American PRI gave some coverage to graffiti practices throughout the ages. A beautiful ‘concordance des temps’

Screen Shot 2013-06-27 at 7.06.51 PM

http://www.theworld.org/2013/05/marking-the-centuries-how-ancient-graffiti-might-be-more-familiar-than-you-realize/

On the original ‘misdeed’:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-22677980

Photo of Ding Jinhao's graffito, from BBC website
Photo of Ding Jinhao’s graffito, from BBC website

Graffiti and declarations of faith – Frédéric Imbert

Rock face covered with drawings and graffiti in kufi arabic from the Islamic period (Arabia 7th-8th centuries AD). The rock fell from the mountain and rolled down in the sand to finish… overturned. All the texts are therefore upside-down. Their content is mainly religious: calls for pardon and mercy, declaration of faith, of divine omnipotence (Photo F. Imbert, Mission Dûmat al-Jandal 2012). Prof. Frederic Imbert, a specialist of arab and islamic epigraphy, is taking part in the graffiti conference.

 

Scribbling through History

Graffiti have been left on natural sites and public monuments in most societies. In spite of their variety in form and content, they can be generally understood as secondary inscriptions that redefine and appropriate such environments: They mark a position in time and history, a relation to space and a territorial claim; they are material displays of individual identity and social interaction.
Although many primary studies of such inscriptions have been carried out, this project wants to address historical graffiti in a holistic manner as a specific cultural practice and as an anthropological object that illuminates these key aspects of human experience.